Spice Up Your Kitchen With These Chinese Holiday Cookie Recipes

Want to go beyond the traditional cookie spree? Expand your horizons with these tasty Chinese holiday cookie recipes!


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Cookies are delicious goodies throughout the year. However, the holidays bring a whole  season of cookie excitement.

 Since Christmas over, now is the time to prepare for Chinese New Year celebrations. 

Here is a list of some Chinese holiday cookie recipes worth trying out!

  1. 1 Chinese Almond Cookies


    Firstly, Chinese immigrants to the U.S. created this cookie in the mid 1800s. It is a modern spin on the Chinese walnut cookie. 

    Most importantly, the nuts in the center of the cookie bring good luck. 

    Chinese almond cookies are now commonly found all over Hong Kong, Macau and Mainland China.  

    Check the recipe here.

  2. 2 Rose Petal Cookies


    Traditionally in Asia they used rosewater for medical and religious purposes. In addition, it is a common sweetener in South Asian cuisine. 

    These modern cookies add rose petals for an Instagrammable aesthetic. 

    Check out the recipe here!

  3. 3 Homemade Fortune Cookies


    This is the perfect Asian-American cookie. It traces back to Japanese and Chinese immigrants in California during the 1920s. 

    While now they are mass-produced, fortune cookies started as a handmade pastry. 

    Check out the recipe and video here!

  4. 4 Lunar New Year Peanut Cookies


    Street vendors sell these traditional Chinese sweets during the Lunar New Year season. They are especially popular in Malaysia and Indonesia. 

    Check out the recipe and video here!

  5. 5 Chinese Butter Cookies


    Similarly, this is another Chinese-American New Year favorite. For example, you can make these cookies as gifts of buttery goodness for relatives. 

    Check out the recipe here!

  6. 6 Sesame Cookies


    This cookie uses a common Chinese seasoning, sesame, and makes it a part of a scrumptious dessert.

    After all, New Year is the best time to strengthen your baking skills.

    Check out the recipe here!

  7. 7 Baked Nian Gao


    This directly translates to “sticky cake." It is the traditional Chinese New Year’s cake. 

    It is good luck because “nian” sounds identical to the word meaning “year” and “gao” sounds identical to “tall.” This cake symbolizes raising oneself taller in the coming year. 

    Check out this recipe!


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Emma Federer

Emma Federer is a wacky screenwriter that uses her voice to celebrate of all things Asian: from C-pop to female stand-ups to the heart-warming experiences of queer Asian Americans.

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